Mother’s Recipe: Perfect Chocolate Chip Cookies

Micah and the boys made these fabulous cookies on Monday night while I did the laundry and washed the dishes. We gave the boys each a cookie and then put them to bed. And then we sat down and folded the laundry and watched a show and each ate three of them. Because they are so good. For the soul, if not for the body.

I was introduced to these cookies by a friend of Micah’s. They were called “Perfect Lizzie Cookies” because they were perfect and they were made by Lizzie (Micah’s friend) and they were cookies. She gave Micah a bagful for his birthday when we were engaged and I wondered why he was marrying me and not her (aside from the fact that Alan had already beaten him to the punch and snatched her off the market). They are thick and chewy and big and delicious. They blew my previous favorites out of the water.

Lizzie (the other one) was kind enough to pass along the recipe (actually, the source of the recipe) when we went to visit her and her family in Alaska when we ran the Mayor’s Marathon there five years ago. Since then our lives have been markedly happier if we have a bag of these frozen cookie dough balls in our freezer, ready to deliver cookiebliss — and status as the best cookie-baking mom in the playgroup — in 20 minutes or less.

Thick and Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies from The New Best Recipe

2 cups plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup unsalted butter (1 1/2 sticks), melted and cooled until warm
1 cup light or dark brown sugar, firmly packed
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 large egg plus 1 large egg yolk
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 cups semisweet chocolate chips (or more or less, depending on your chip-to-dough ratio preference)

Adjust oven racks to upper-and lower-middle positions. Heat oven to 325°F. Line two large baking sheets with parchment paper. (I rarely do this because I never remember to get parchment paper. If you don’t have parchment paper, you can use foil, or you can use nothing. The cookies usually come off fine, depending on how “used” your pans are.)

Whisk flour, baking soda, and salt together in medium bowl; set aside.

Either by hand or with an electric mixer, mix butter and sugars until thoroughly blended. Beat in egg, yolk and vanilla until combined. Add dry ingredients and beat at low speed just until combined. Stir in chips to taste.

Roll scant 1/4 cup dough into ball. Holding dough ball in fingertips of both hands, pull into two equal halves. Rotate halves ninety degrees and with jagged surfaces facing up, join halves together at their base, again forming a single ball, being careful not to smooth dough’s uneven surface. Place formed dough onto cookie sheet, leaving 2 1/2-inches between each ball. (Or just roll them and go, if you’re not into aesthetics.)

Bake, reversing position of cookie sheets halfway through baking, until cookies are light golden brown and outer edges start to harden yet centers are still soft and puffy, 15 to 18 minutes. Cool cookies on sheets. When cooled, peel cookies from parchment.

Makes about 18 3-inch cookies.

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2 Comments

  1. These are indeed the best cookies. I made some this week. BUT, one thing is needful – when you melt the butter, melt most of it (at least 3/4) it to the point that it gets slightly browned. Swirl it over the stove for a few minutes until it starts to foam up, and then pour it in the bowl with the rest of the unmelted butter, and stir until all of the butter is melted.

    [Reply]

    lizzie Reply:

    That sounds like a fancy technique. I’ve heard people rave about browned butter, but I hadn’t thought to try it with these cookies. Next time . . . . 🙂

    [Reply]

  2. Oh my word! Just made the Perfect Choc Chip Cookies! They are “PERFECT” indeed! Best date I ever had!

    [Reply]

    lizzie Reply:

    They definitely stand up to their name, that’s for sure! Glad you like them.

    [Reply]

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